I make theater, film, and opera. My work is about cataclysmic things like love, family, genocide, the climate crisis, disease, and disability. I use story and shared experience to create an opening for healing, belonging, and growth. To this end, the work I do often puts audiences in direct contact with the resources they need.

Biography

Los Angeles artist Diana Wyenn works in theater, opera, and film rigorously exploring trauma and healing, and advocating for equity and environmental and disability justice. Recent work includes Blood/Sugar, an award-winning autobiographical performance that illuminates, embodies, and challenges the global diabetes crisis, and Kristina Wong for Public Office, a critically acclaimed, raucous performance-art campaign/rally co-devised with performance artist Kristina Wong that calls for sustained civic engagement. Wyenn’s work has been presented at performing arts centers and universities across the United States and is supported by the National Arts and Disability Center, Center for Cultural Innovation, and California Arts Council. She has directed and choreographed projects for the LA Phil, National Sawdust, Beth Morrison Projects, The Walt Disney Company, Skirball Cultural Center, SummerStage, Grand Performances, Pomona College, Occidental College, and many more; received new work commissions from The Women’s Building, American Jewish University, and T1International; and been featured in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, American Theatre Magazine, Daily Beast, and Fast Company, and on NPR. Wyenn earned a BFA in Drama from New York University, is an associate member of SDC, and co-founded Plain Wood Productions. 

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Image description > Diana Wyenn, a fair-skinned woman with short brown hair, wearing a red button up shirt, looks into the camera. Photo by Stefanie Keenan.

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Image description > Diana addresses a circle of student actors and technicians during a note session for Quiara Alegría Hudes' Water by the Spoonful at Pomona College. Photo by Mae Koo.